Charles Gounod

Roméo et Juliette

Apr 23 - May 12 Buy Tickets from $25

Bartlett Sher’s production of Gounod’s sumptuous Shakespeare adaptation was a hit of the 2016–17 Met season (“a revelation” declared the Huffington Post). Now the sweeping tragedy returns with Ailyn Pérez and Bryan Hymel, both celebrated in French repertoire, as the star crossed young lovers. Plácido Domingo conducts.

Production a gift of The Sybil B. Harrington Endowment Fund

Revival a gift of Rolex

Read Synopsis
  • Sung In
  • French
  • Met Titles In
  • English
  • German
  • Spanish
  • Estimated Run Time
  • 3 hrs 2 mins
  • House Opens
  • Acts I, II, III/1 75 mins
  • Intermission 35 mins
  • Acts III/2, IV, V 72 mins
  • Opera Ends
Apr 23 - May 12 Buy Tickets from $25

Cast

{{::castMember.name | initials}} {{::castMember.name | limitTo:3}}
{{::castMember.imageAltText}}

{{::castMember.role | removeNumbering}}

{{::castMember.name | transposeComma}}

TBA

Performed
Performing
All Dates
{{::dateGroup.month | momentMonth:true}} {{::date | momentFormat:'D'}}{{$last ? '' : ','}}

World premiere: Théâtre Lyrique, Paris, 1867. Perhaps the most enduringly successful of the many operatic settings of the world’s consummate love story, Roméo et Juliette is an excellent example of French Romanticism, a tradition that values subtlety, sensuality, and graceful vocal delivery over showy effects. In the opera there is a slight shift of focus away from the word games of the original play and a greater focus on the two lovers, who are given four irresistible duets, including a brief final reunion in the tomb scene that does not appear in the play.

Creators

Charles Gounod (1818–1893) showed early promise as a musician and achieved commercial success with his opera Faust in 1859. Among his most famous works is a setting of the Ave Maria based on a piece by J. S. Bach. Jules Barbier (1825–1901) and Michel Carré (1821–1872) were the leading librettists of their time in France, providing the text for many other operas, including Faust for Gounod, Mignon (also from Goethe) and Hamlet for Ambroise Thomas, and Les Contes d’Hoffmann for Jacques Offenbach.

Production Bartlett Sher

Set Designer Michael Yeargan

Costume Designer Catherine Zuber

Lighting Designed by Jennifer Tipton

Choreographer Chase Brock

Charles Gounod

Composer

Charles Gounod

Setting

In Shakespeare’s lifetime, Italy was a land of many small city-states in constant warfare with one another, but this same country was also the cradle of the Renaissance, with its astounding explosion of art and science. The image invoked by the story’s setting in the ancient city of Verona, then, is a beautiful but dangerous world where poetry or violence might erupt at any moment. The Met’s new production moves the action to the 18th century.